Cognitive Dissonance & Race in Bermuda

Emancipation Day & T-Shirts

It was extremely disappointing, when flicking through the Bernews photos of Cup Match, to see that some individuals have created t-shirts to mock the ‘White Mental Illness is Killing African Bermudians (Racism)’; what is more they decided to flaunt this on Emancipation Day of all days.

Photo credit to Bernews

Photo credit to Bernews

I’m overseas right now, and Scotland doesn’t celebrate Emancipation Day unfortunately; or ‘Somers Day’ either.

A curious juxtaposition those two holidays – celebrating emancipation from slavery (and a holiday that was made by the people, not gifted from above), followed by the start of colonialism in Bermuda…

To compensate for not being able to celebrate Cup Match in the traditional way, I thought re-reading Frantz Fanon’s A Dying Colonialism would cover both Emancipation and colonialism…

Black Skin, White Masks

Which brought to mind the first book by Frantz Fanon I ever read, Black Skin, White Masks, especially after the whole business with the sign and the subsequent t-shirts at Cup Match.

Here’s an extract which I think is worth quoting in its entirety:

“Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong.  When they are presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new evidence cannot be accepted.  It would create a feeling that is extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance.  And because it is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalist, ignore and even deny anything that doesn’t fit in with the core belief.” 

Credit to Bernews

Credit to Bernews

It seems to me that this quote, some sixty odd years old, is still quite relevant.

It speaks to the central, provocative, argument of the sign, that racism is, or at least could be, understood as a mental illness.

It’s important to note here that this ‘racism as a mental illness’ is not necessarily the overt racism of the past, explicitly anti-Black ideology, explicit hate.

Nor is it restricted to Whites; it is a pathology based on Whiteness, and that helps maintain White privilege, but it affects both those that benefit and those that are the victims of it.

Or to quote again from Black Skin, White Masks:

“The Negro enslaved by his inferiority, the white man enslaved by his superiority alike behave in accordance with a neurotic orientation.”

Post-Racial Delusions

Whether you like the individual who raised the sign or not, to focus on her and not the point she raised is to deflect and engage in personal attacks.

It is also to fundamentally miss the point.

Far too many have only taken a superficial and limited reading of the sign, and reacted unthinkingly.

Whether this is due to ignorance or insecurities, I cannot say.

What I will say is that there is a distinct trend amongst significant segments of our people to adopt what I can only describe as a superficial, a-historical and delusional approach to race in the Bermuda context.

Essentially, this approach sees our island as post-racial, as in our race issues ended with the end of segregation.

In this world view the inequalities we see today are not due to historical consequences of slavery, and subsequently segregation; rather, it is due to personal responsibility.

Any attempt to point out the reality of racial inequality in Bermuda, and how this manifests itself in a number of forms (health inequalities, racial differences in life expectancy, imbalances in both the prison and the boardroom, etc), or to even discuss race itself, is branded as racist.

White Washed Racism

More than that, it’s answered by an avalanche of pictures of blacks and whites holding hands, or inspirational quotes from Martin Luther King Jr or Nelson Mandela, which betray both a superficial understanding of race and a selective understanding of the complex arguments of MLK or Mandiba.

To understand racism solely in terms of individual animosity is to misunderstand the complexity of racism, and to deflect from the issue of structural racism – which is the primary problem in Bermuda today (although we do have a significant reserve of explicit racism, more than I had initially thought).

On the sanitised ‘white-washed’ versions of MLK, for example, they ignore his arguments that his ‘I had a dream’ vision is only achievable through a full confrontation with racism in all its forms, especially in terms of inequalities that have been created by slavery, segregation and discrimination – a form of reparations and affirmative action.

Our racial inequalities exist.  To deny that is delusional.

To react to anyone pointing out these inequalities and theorising on how racism is multi-faceted as ‘racists’ is irrational.

To think of racism solely in terms of explicit racism is delusional.

To have (a) conceived of these shirts; and (b) to actually create and wear them, on Emancipation Day itself, just underlines the racial deformation of our society.

Some final (short) points:

  1. The younger generations are more susceptible to adopting, initially, an ahistorical and post-racial delusion.  This is primarily due to a steady diet of post-racial propaganda from US media, but also due to a loss of the collective memory of our segregated past.
  2. Expatriates, from largely White majority countries, also are susceptible to this ahistorical and post-racial delusion.
  3. This racial mystification affects primarily Whites, but also Blacks.
  4. Analysis of statistics and a critical reading of history (but also sociology and psychology) help to expose the reality.
  5. The reactions to this sign, including these shirts, is an example of cognitive dissonance, primarily from Whites.

One final quote from Black Skin, White Masks:

“The colonised is elevated above his jungle status in proportion to his adoption of the mother country’s cultural standards.”

Change ‘colonised’ to ‘Black’ and ‘mother country’s’ with ‘Whites, and you have Bermuda.

Alternatively, one could read it as ‘PLP’ and ‘OBA’…  PLPers (or, rather, non-OBAers) are regarded as ‘sheeple’, but once they accept OBA mantras, they’re ‘enlightened’.

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27 thoughts on “Cognitive Dissonance & Race in Bermuda

  1. nice clear thinking here jonathan! fanon’s work will likely be a resource to explain our dysfunctions in this area long into the future I think.

  2. There us a flip side to this, which is that there is a significant level of casual racism from black people towards Others in Bermuda, and most people do not regard slavery etc as a relevant excuse for it any more. This racism is especially prevalent towards Philipinos, and Portuguese Bermudians. There is also a particularly wicked form of behaviour akin to racism against black or mixed people who align themselves politically against the PLP. Uncle tom slurs etc should be dealt with as strongly as derogatory uses of the n word.

    The mentally ill t-shirts is a light hearted way of sticking up two fingers to these casual racists and those who apologise for them. It’s nothing more deep than that, and certainly not cognitive dissonance

  3. Yes, there are problems directed towards Filipinos, etc, I don’t think anyone’s denying that.

    And that itself can largely be seen through attempts by capital to depress wages overall through exploiting cheap labour; as well as misdirecting these concerns not towards the bosses and the capitalist system but instead to the easily identifiable (due to racial characteristics) workers. Which is problematic.

    I fundamentally disagree with your argument that the ‘mentally ill t-shirts is a light hearted way of sticking up two fingers to these casual racists’.

    That may be how you understand it, I don’t deny that. However it betrays a lack of understanding what the sign said; and that reaction to it actually supports the argument the sign made. And that certainly is a form of cognitive dissonance.

  4. Jonny , I wonder if you could be specific ( like in a whole new post even) about structural racism in Bermuda. I think your last quote is one that confuses people , if only because it hints at another system based on distinct black cultural qualities that have been denied by the dominant white culture, without explaining what this system might look like. I feel we are small enough in Bermuda to be very specific. I mean there are family owned (white) businesses , like say Butterfield and Vallis , that unless you are a Butterfield , you are never going to be the head of. We have foreign owned banks ( H.S.B.C.) that have no emotional or cultural connection to our society. We have Re insurance companies that dominate our economy that are seemingly racial in their employment practices and we have little or no leverage against them. I guess what I want help on , is sort of defining what is the ‘Bermudian Dream’ in 2014 , and how do we get there?

  5. I would say that at a minimum the ‘Bermudian Dream’ as regards race would be that our statistics would no longer show any significant differences as per race.

    As such, we’d see a prison population reflective of our demographics. Same with the boardroom. Wealth. Life expectancy. Health. Etc.

    This would need a combination of reparations (which to me is not a check from historical slave owners to direct descendants of slaves), but rather a focus on eradicating inequalities, through reducing poverty, via social welfare interventions, and affirmative action.

  6. I actually think the t-shirts are more offensive to disabled people than to black people, as the disabled sign is equating mental illness with physical disability. On those grounds I would condemn it, but not on racial grounds.

  7. I don’t think the shirts are necessarily offensive to black people, any more than I think the original sign should’ve been offensive to white’s in the first place; the criticism is the misunderstanding of the sign and the reaction it generated.

    Although I do find it distasteful that such ignorance was featured on Emancipation Day.

    I agree with you on the disabled sign – though it does provide an opening to wider discussion on how Bermuda handles our differently abled compatriots and visitors.

  8. To be a racist in a racist society is to be normal-Frantz Fanon- He wrote this in the book;” the Wretched of the Earth; which described the mindset of the the colonizer and the colonize. One of the many books he wrote which dealt with race and racial behaviour. Colonialism for the most part is anachronistic ; the world having moved on; accept in this country Bermuda. We still get excited over Queen’s honour awards which we place above anything we get in the way of a national award from Bermuda. We think that having a British governor is normal despite the fact that we essentially are paying for the British diplomatic presence in our country to the tune of over one million dollars a year. Not to mention that one man his wife and perhaps a dog occupy a valuable piece of land that would be better suited to put into use for the people of Bermuda. What is this got to with race and the writings of Frantz Fanon; well a lot. It is almost as if Bermuda has been reduce with our quaint colonial system; and it remains a colonial system despite the great store we put on our suppose internal self rule which is nothing more than words written on a paper; when the governor vetoed a motion passed in Bermuda’s parliament; to that of a laboratory specimen of the way colonialism used to work. And if colonialism remains a frozen relic of the past; so is the question of race relations which in a sense is frozen. It’s true while there is no laws on the books which codifies racism or racial segregation; it never is far from the social and political discourse in this country and thus remains in the minds of the people and of course the legacy of Bermuda’s racial past is still a Bermuda’s reality; hence the importance of the writings of Frantz Fanon even after all these years he wrote in the teeth of colonialism and racism. Of course academics and scholars such as Frantz Fanon are dismissed in the white academic world mostly because of what it is said about the white world and it’s mindset when dealing with the non-white world. Look at the reaction to Nana Peggy’s sign? What was she really guilty off? accept to have assaulted the racial sensibilities of the white community which it seems would rather have that protected rather than confronted.

  9. “What was she really guilty off? accept to have assaulted the racial sensibilities of the white community which it seems would rather have that protected rather than confronted”

    Well, The People’s Campaign distanced themselves from her sign and (albeit dragged screaming perhaps), CURB eventually decided it was divisive.

    So, take your pick with regards to what she was guilty of.

    More importantly, if you feel that that is the way to take this wide and deep issue forward, good luck with that. What would you have white people do? Have a reaction to the sign and say, “gee, we really ought to do something about this racial thing?”

    It really isn’t going to happen that way believe me.

    For me, her sign simply takes us backwards. .

  10. Uneducated and ignorant people are why Bermuda can’t move forward- is why Bermuda can’t get rid of so called racism! That woman holding that sign was WRONG- and now people decided to make fun of her- is funny and i think it proves OUR point! Stop using the RACE CARD- it doesn’t work anymore….. There are too many mix race kids on our beautiful island that to keep on trying to make it a black and white things its just childish and causes things like this to happen. So i say “Way to go my fellow Bermudians who did wear these shirts- and shame on you for those who think their race card still works SMDH!!! Maybe if my generation took over 30-45 yrs of age- then Bermuda could MOVE FORWARD…..

  11. “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalist, ignore and even deny anything that doesn’t fit in with the core belief.”

    And it becomes conventional wisdom which was good enough for Grandma, but not necessarily good enough or workable for today.

    As a species we are inherently lazy. We fail to test, for example, whether yesterday’s conventional wisdom has either value or purpose in today’s setting. Logic becomes irrelevant. Facts become irrelevant. It was good enough for Grandma – it will be good enough for me.

    Hardly surprising we don’t go forward, if we employ yesterday’s thinking to today.

  12. what i have often wondered , looking at Bermuda is the past 50 years , where are the major Black owned businesses? It would appear that bermudians of Portugese decent have had the greatest change in fortune economically in this boom time. I mean where is the BIG black owned construction firm ( the one that would rival D&J , Island, Correia, BCM?) If you look at grocery business , its a similar picture. its too easy to say we are post racial when there are still patterns of wealth that so clearly don’t gel with the racial make up of our population. Now , how you go about ‘normalizing’ this in our world today , I am not so sure

  13. I suppose you could consider the success of People’s Pharmacy as inspirational to black-owned businesses, James C, but in comparison to other businesses, maybe it’s still small fry in the Bermuda landscape.

    With regard to the sign, the backlash and the subsequent t-shirts mocking the sign’s commentary, I think it was an expected reaction from some quarters. While there may have been a deeper meaning behind the words as Jonathan points out, there was nothing in the sign itself or the remarks of the woman holding it, to suggest it. The sign was viewed as inciteful, inflammatory and provocative. And in an era of quick bite-backs (and the Internet), someone was going to come up with a play on the original statement, satirical or otherwise… hence the T-shirts.

    So instead of useful discussion on race issues, we have tit-for-tat and one-upmanship. Maybe it’s not at all dissimilar to what we hear in Parliament, unfortunately.

  14. Well I am not the people’s campaign or CURB; heck some white people in this country thought the Big Conversation was racist and at this point it does not matter to me what White people think. From my point of view it is what it is; and I still have not gotten an answer to a question I have asked several times and I have ask it in a general sense; What is it that I a black Bermudian have in common with my fellow white Bermudian?

  15. Alvin,

    I could say things like “we are Bermudians that ought to be able to live and work together which needs an input from all parties to make it work but, ifr I have read you correctly, I sense from your question that you don’t want to do that.

    You seem to be suggesting that you either (a) think you have nothing in common with “any others” (inc Whites) or (b) you don’t want to have anything in common with others.

    If that’s the case, then you should carry on and row your own canoe in life. Many do that (of all colours, classses and creeds) and they do so successfully.

    Personally, despite the anguish and day to day issues between peoples, I wouldn’t want to opt out of society and neither would I want a society that was made up of just people like me either.

    How boring.

    But, if that’s what you want to do, then good luck.

  16. JenM, I don’t disagree with your assertion that ‘Uneducated and ignorant people are why Bermuda can’t move forward- is why Bermuda can’t get rid of so called racism!’ – The question is who is the uneducated and ignorant in this occasion?

    To me it is those refusing to confront the very real racism that continues to exist in Bermuda, and reacting negatively rather than engaging in a constructive discussion on race are the ones that are holding Bermuda back from moving forward. Quite frankly, the biggest obstacle to getting beyond race in Bermuda is, in my opinion and experience,White intransigence on the issue.

    I am curious about what you mean by ‘race card’. How does that apply to this situation?

  17. Mike, I think the People’s Campaign were worried about her sign distracting from the focus of the march – which I think we can all agree it has. So I can understand their asking her to use her alternative sign.

    Similarly, I think CURB were also thinking in terms of the potential distraction. Personally, I think the response by CURB (and also the People’s Campaign) was overly timid and an abdication of responsibility in terms of helping aid greater understanding of the sign. I am disappointed in them for that.

    What I would have White people do is to (a) not knee-jerk react to things like this; (b) not shirk the sometimes uncomfortable discussions about race; (c) seek to understand the reality of race issues; and (d) actually contribute to a discussion on how we can transcend our racial inequalities.

    We’ve tried more timid approaches to discussing race in this country and it got no-where. We need only look at the prolonged life of segregation here to see how effective the cautious approach moved this country forward (in reality it kept us, at best, stationary). Even when the PLP were in power we saw them back down in the face of White reaction. We saw that most clearly with the proposed Workforce Equity Act, but also with the proposals of minimum wage legislation and mandatory overtime. Heck, we even saw reaction to the Employment Act 2000 and the restructuring of our constituency system.

    Quite frankly, the only things that have forced our island to resolve these issues has been organised protest, assassinations and riots. Progress has not come through a timid approach expecting Whites/the oligarchy to ‘do the right thing’ – change has only come because it was forced on the powers that be lest they lose it all. The question for White Bermuda is whether they’ve learned from the past, or will they plunge us back into the only recourse that has been effective, that of militant action?

    Now, I don’t share the anxiety I’m seeing in some social media sites about riots coming, at least any time soon, but I am seeing a studied provocation coming from Whites and the current Government. It doesn’t have to be, but at the moment they seem to, at best, be sleep-walking into it, or directly provoking it with their insensitivity, intransigence and ignorance.

  18. Tryangle, I agree the sign was seen as inflammatory and provocative, and that was easily predictable. The question, to me, is why was it seen that way and what does that say about Bermuda, specifically White Bermuda, today?

  19. Jonathan,

    “We’ve tried more timid approaches to discussing race in this country and it got no-where. We need only look at the prolonged life of segregation here to see how effective the cautious approach moved this country forward (in reality it kept us, at best, stationary). Even when the PLP were in power we saw them back down in the face of White reaction. We saw that most clearly with the proposed Workforce Equity Act, but also with the proposals of minimum wage legislation and mandatory overtime. Heck, we even saw reaction to the Employment Act 2000 and the restructuring of our constituency system”.

    I am talking about now – not yesterday, irrespective of when that was!

    Mandatory overtime? What – contractually required to provide it and contractually required to work it? You can’t get a Bermudian to work on a Saturday for goodness sake.

    Minimum wage? Can you imagine the black owners of local businesses accepting that? It wouldn’t have any effect on IB – so who looses out?

    Why not mention Affirmative action? Can you imagine black business owners having to employ a white person or was it the intention to “not require that” under the legislation?

    I am talking about this younger generation (of which I am not a member sadly) – who see things differently to the way I used to see them and the way my parents saw things. You couldn’t change my parents views if your life depended upon it; my views did change. Sure – I know that “the young” aren’t in charge – but they will be one day. And gawd help politicians who fail to listen to what the young are saying.

    At it’s very simplest, you can’t have an older generation (however hurt, however they feel) holding the next generation back. I know you didn’t respond when I said this before, but I’ll say it again………….we can’t have older and hurt people telling and conditioning their children that every as yet unborn white child is a racist. We will get absolutely nowhere if we allow that to continue.

    “Quite frankly, the only things that have forced our island to resolve these issues has been organised protest, assassinations and riots. Progress has not come through a timid approach expecting Whites/the oligarchy to ‘do the right thing’ – change has only come because it was forced on the powers that be lest they lose it all. The question for White Bermuda is whether they’ve learned from the past, or will they plunge us back into the only recourse that has been effective, that of militant action?”

    Tomorrow is what is important – not today. Sure, I recognise “old white farts” who will never change when I see them. They aren’t going to change their mind – just as the “old black farts” won’t either. Together they are holding everyone back. The young blacks have no real understanding of the true hardship their parents had – they just ride on the coat tails.

    As I said before, the script is worn out and not working. Time to change the playbook.

  20. I think it’s just human nature to react to what we immediately see, frankly. You for instance, may read twice, interpret the comments in a certain way, but a far bigger majority of people are going to read literally, “White Mental Illness… is killing African Bermudians”. Period.

    Maybe it’s because we’re collectively in a post-Politically Correct age, where we’re keen to pick up on any insult (implied or otherwise) and lash back. So we’ll hear responses like “is she calling white people mentally ill” or “the only people killing African Bermudians are other African Bermudians”.

    I don’t think it’s a specific Bermuda issue, or even white Bermuda. Most people aren’t going to seek the deeper meanings or interpretations behind the message in this case. Is it possible to have people take that step back, try to figure out where the author was coming from, and show empathy? I dunno.

  21. Mike- you still have not answer my question; What do I a black Bermudian have in common with my fellow white Bermudian? I will tell you what we do not have in common; to begin with a common history. Mines has been one of struggle; a common view of the future? To do that we will have to accept that it is in our interests to create a common focus as a people and that can only be done by declaring a nation. On that day Bermuda would have finally laid to rest as to who is a Bermudian. That does not mean we would have solve all our problems; but what it will mean that all the calls that we must all walk together will have less of a hollow ring than it does now. South Africa has not solve all it’s problems and the legacy of it’s racial past; but at least it now consider itself as a common nation with a common future; and America as racist as it remains does see itself as a common nation as the struggle continues to escape the legacy of it’s racial past, Bermuda is yet to take this important step and thus has not laid the ground work for that commonality that we all claim to want; but lack the courage and vision to begin the journey.

  22. Mike,

    I did mention affirmative action – perhaps you are forgetting the what the proposed Workforce Equity Act entailed? I do think you rather misunderstand the application of affirmative action however.

    Mandatory overtime simply meant that any worker working beyond the 37.5 hour week would be paid those excessive hours at an overtime rate. That is currently not the case outside of jobs subject to union negotiated contracts.

    And believe me, I am talking about today.

    I’m not aware of any situation where people are ‘telling and conditioning their children that every as yet unborn white child is a racist’ – quite frankly I see that as a combination of a fundamental misunderstanding and a white myth.

    At best there are some people who are telling their children that there are continuing racial inequalities, there are continuing actual racist practices (be they conscious by their perpetrators or not), and that applications of post-racial ‘kumbaya’ ideologies within this context is de facto racist in as much as it helps perpetuate racial inequalities and other practices.

  23. Alvin,

    “Mike- you still have not answer my question; What do I a black Bermudian have in common with my fellow white Bermudian?

    You are right, we don’t share a common history. I’m grateful for that as your’s has been horrendous. That said, I REALLY don’t think you want to share my history, and so I will spare you the details. Hopefully you are not making the assumption that “this is a white guy, with silver spoon in mouth etc”?

    Maybe it is the way that we view and use our history as well as the history itself that separates us?.

    Not sure what it is that motivates me, but I have always taken the view that whatever the past, it is tomorrow that is of crucial importance and it has always been a challenge. I was poorly educated, my parents were very poor even relative to today. My education came later in life – and at my expense. My first job? Cleaning toilets.

    The one thing that was one my side was that when I applied for my first “proper” job in industry, was that a degree was not a requirement. Today of course, that is not the case. Worse still we are reaching (or have reached) the point where a BA/BSc just doesn’t cut it. Call it academic inflation if you want, but today it’s an MA/MSc that is needed.

    For what it’s worth, I have met some very worrying people with good degrees who will never cut it in life and certainly not in the world of work. I have always looked for a good track record, rather than just academic success.

    As to having a common view of the future, well I sense again that we differ if you are talking Independence that is, I don’t accept that we can’t have a common focus unless we declare a nation.

    And as for the US being one nation looking to escape the legacy of it’s racist past – are you so sure? I don’t see any real evidence of that at all. Ironically (in the truest sense of the word), I see a racist GOP looking to create an American/American, a new breed of American – rather than what they all are – American/Immigrant. A group of wealthy, white old farts, who hate the poor, who believe that those who can’t find work actually don’t want work and if you are poor such that you can’t afford quality medical insurance, please die quietly over in the corner.

    I actually sense that Bermuda is far more advanced than the US in that regard. I cut the US some slack by saying, “they are still a young country, still growing, still evolving, but with a very long way still to go”.

    You need more than courage and vision to begin that journey. Being able to talk to each other without hatred in hearts and bile in mouths as we still see here, is also required. As long as Black people think that someone is a racist because of their whiteness, that conversation will never start in earnest.

  24. “I’m not aware of any situation where people are ‘telling and conditioning their children that every as yet unborn white child is a racist’ – quite frankly I see that as a combination of a fundamental misunderstanding and a white myth”.

    If the unborn white child was not a racist, how come I am seen to be one by so many Black people without giving them cause to believe that I am?

    No point in responding Jonathan. You will have to believe one thing – I will have to believe another. Obviously a polemic.

  25. Alvin – no matter how dark skinned you are, if your Bermuda roots go back more than a couple of generations then I guarantee that a significant percentage of your ancestors were white. So you DO share a common history whether you like it or not. Many of your ancestors hunted mammoths, farmed in cold northern Europe, built towns and churches from stone, were viking or Saxon warriors or thralls, medieval serfs, etc. some of whom eventually wound up in Bermuda voluntarily and others not entirely of their free will but as indentured workers.

    And many people you assume to be white have some subsaharan ancestors.

    We have a more common history then you comprehend.

    This notion people have that they are black and have no white heritage is crazy and quite sad.

  26. can someone explain to me why we have to be one nation to get along. “What do I a black Bermudian have in common with my fellow white Bermudian” are u kidding me!. what does the color of a man skin have to do with that. in common? i dont know? do you play football, basketball, cricket, chess, fish., party, drink, smoke, teach, boy scouts,girls scouts. these are the things that u have in common with other people. like the fact did u grow up with them and do u share memories and what not. i am white guy that grew up in Bermuda under the govt schooling system and u ask what we have in common. did you not go school here did u not make life long friends that was a different color then yourself. reading ur letter makes me think Bermuda will never come together. i answered ur question now can u answer mine.
    Why is it acceptable in the black community for a plp black man to call another black man an uncle tom/ house nixxer. The same person called a white man slave master with out any proof of them having anything to do with that. all while in the house being recorded and witness by all the Bermudian people. how come this can happen in the near past and when it happened where was the outrage? where was the marching? and the loss of voter? nothing in fact i think plp got stronger. now how can we have a real talk about it when we cant even talk on the same level. how can we stop racism when some people and leaders of this country are openly racist. why can plp talk all that racism and at the same time get all upset because people are saying that some people need to get off their backsides and help Bermuda. please explain to me how calling some one house nixxer, uncle tom, slave master, is not racist but telling some one to get off their back side is.. we all must be held accountable and the parties need to know that people will not stand behind them just because of their skin color.
    i find it funny that you want to talk like the white race are the one who openly are racist.
    i dont understand how my grandfather who came from Africa came to Bermuda didnt know English worked and had kids and a family and was able to buy a home and have a good life. then my dad was born. he left school very early to work and support his family. he worked like a dog 20 hours days and 7 days a week. he was able with no help FROM ANYBODY to mass a good wealth. and even when i was a kids and my friends came over my house they would act like i was rich and my father had all this money. what they fail to see was my father was not around that much he was working all the time to achieve what got. how was this possible. since my father people did not have enough money for him to continue high school. He had to leave to work to make that money for food. he has never had a hand up other then his back breaking work. why do we all ways look to other people for failure when we need to look inside of our self’s. we fail because we fail to plan so we plan to fail . one more thing. i wish people would take the time out and watch the govt and their spending like they watch the race war. how can plp spend 2.5 b and i dont see any marches about that. THIS EFFECT EVERYBODY NO MATTER SKIN COLOR. WHY ARE THEY NOT HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THAT. IT NOT FAIR THAT ANOTHER GOVT HAS TO WORK UNDER SUCH STRESS AND BEHIND THE 8 BALL TO START WITH. I WONDER HOW THE PLP PEOPLE WOULD HAVE THOUGHT IF UBP GAVE POWER OVER IN 2.5 B IN DEBT. WE NEED TO LOOK AT THE PROBLEMS THAT MATTER WITHOUT SEEING COLOR.

  27. If we remember we are talking about this is a POLITICAL context, the most obvious manifestation of a ‘white mental illness’ is the fact that the white community votes en masse for the UBP then OBA. I have been thinking about peoples reaction to the sign , and asking myself what is this illness exactly?. What I think , is that even the most liberal and informed white people , somewhere in the shadows of their minds, harbour a bit of fear. Not a fear of black people directly , not a hatred of other races , but a fear generated by guilt. A fear that there should and will be some sort of ‘payback’ for our collective behavior in the past 400years. What binds white Bermudians together in terms of politics , therefore, is not an active desire to suppress and disadvantage black Bermudians , but this much subtler aspect of our psyche. Which is why we can obviously ‘ have black friends ‘ , listen to Reggae music etc etc and still only vote for the UBP or OBA.

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